The Juggalos Marched: Scenes From The Rally

By Andrew Flanagan

People gather at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., for Saturday's Juggalo March.

In 2011, the Justice Department classified Juggalos — fans of the Michigan-born rap duo Insane Clown Posse — as gang members, writing that “Crimes committed by Juggalos are sporadic, disorganized, individualistic, and often involve simple assault, personal drug use and possession, petty theft, and vandalism.”

Juggalo March on D.C.

  • People gather at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., for Saturday’s Juggalo March.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • A Juggalo helps collect trash during at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., during Saturday's Juggalo March.

    A Juggalo helps collect trash during at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., during Saturday’s Juggalo March.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • Rocko Jenkins shares his tater tots with fellow Juggalos at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., during Saturday's event.

    Rocko Jenkins shares his tater tots with fellow Juggalos at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., during Saturday’s event.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • Juggalos apply their signature clown make-up.

    Juggalos apply their signature clown make-up.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • A Juggalo nun in the crowd during Saturday's event.

    A Juggalo nun in the crowd during Saturday’s event.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • Juggalos brought their families to participate in Saturday's event. Here, the assembly marches following an afternoon of performances and speeches.

    Juggalos brought their families to participate in Saturday’s event. Here, the assembly marches following an afternoon of performances and speeches.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • Juggalos marching away from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., for Saturday's Juggalo March.

    Juggalos marching away from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., for Saturday’s Juggalo March.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • Violent J (left, center) and Shaggy 2 Dope (right) of Insane Clown Posse address the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., at Saturday's Juggalo March.

    Violent J (left, center) and Shaggy 2 Dope (right) of Insane Clown Posse address the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., at Saturday’s Juggalo March.

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

  • Trina Mason, from St Augustine Fla., holds up her

    Trina Mason, from St Augustine Fla., holds up her “Hatchetman” cut-out sign in Washington, D.C., during Saturday’s Juggalo March. She’s there to show her support for Psychopathic Records. “It’s there to save lives — it’s therapy as music.”

    Logan Werlinger for NPR

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Yesterday, the Juggalos took to the National Mall in Washington, D.C. to protest the classification, holding a day-long rally to argue that they are a family, not a gang. Members of this subculture, who look to each other for support and a sense of belonging, watched speeches — peppered by the signature Juggalo cry of “whoop whoop” — and performances before marching near the Lincoln Memorial. (Photographs by Logan Werlinger for NPR.)

Find our coverage of the Juggalo March here, and find an explainer of the subculture here.

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Source:: http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2017/09/17/551624781/the-juggalos-marched-scenes-from-the-rally?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=storiesfromnpr