Vince Staples: 'We Live In A Space Where Your Name Isn't Enough'

Vince Staples is currently traveling the country on The Life Aquatic Tour.

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Long Beach, Calif., has produced such legendary rappers as Snoop Dogg, Warren G and the late Nate Dogg, all of whom won international acclaim — and persistent criticism — for work that some said glorified gang life. Now, a generation later, the city has a new star: Vince Staples.

Staples first turned heads with his album Summertime ’06, released in 2015, about growing up in Long Beach and his time in the notorious Los Angeles gang the Crips. Two years later, Staples is still getting acclaim for his music. Rolling Stone called him “one of hip-hop’s true rising stars” — and he’s only 23.

Now, Staples is getting ready to release a second album, which he told Vice will be called Big Fish Theory. He’s currently touring, and on his way through Washington, D.C., he stopped by NPR’s studios to speak with Michel Martin. Hear their conversation at the audio link, and read on for an edited transcript.

Michel Martin: I take it you’re not all that comfortable with the acclaim you’ve received. I read in one interview that you said, “I’m not a star. I’m a person with a job.

Vince Staples: That was me being sarcastic because, you know, they liked it. No, it’s just — the idea of the “magical Negro.”

So you’re not magical.

No, what a magical Negro means is “Oh, you’re smart?” “Oh, you’re talented?” That means they’re assuming that you’re not supposed to be. So they can kind of keep those compliments — they’re backhanded.

One of the things that people have noted about you is that you take a lot of the tropes that people are used to and you twist it around. Your short film Prima Donnaopens with this stereotypical hip-hop scene, with scantily-clad women shaking their butts in your face, and then within a minute, you see it’s a set, it’s all made up. And you kind of turn it on its head and offer some really pointed reflections about fame, money and celebrity. You do seem like an old soul, like you’ve lived a lot longer than your years, and I’m wondering where those insights come from.

Now, this would be my question, just to play devil’s advocate. What’s the appropriate amount of years to have that insight?

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I think it’s less about that and more just about what you take from your personal experiences. ‘Cause you can learn something in 15 minutes, [that] it could take someone 15 years to learn. So I don’t think it’s really a timetable. I think it just depends on what you choose to pay attention to based on your experiences. ‘Cause we all have opportunities to learn the same things, essentially. Sometimes we just avoid them.

You’ve also been really open about the fact that a lot of the things you talk about have been real in your life — things that you’ve seen, things that you’ve experienced. You’ve said that gangbanging isn’t something you opt into, it’s something that’s around you. Is that how you’d describe it?

I don’t really feel the need to describe it, for the simple fact that you can go see and ask someone that is there. This is my thing: We gotta stop pretending that we care about people, and what they do, if we don’t. That’s an honest thing — ’cause what it is, is a sense of camaraderie, sense of brotherhood, sense of belonging. The same way if you live in this country, you’re American; if you live in another country you can be whatever they call it there. You’re a Democrat or you’re a Republican. You’re this or you’re that. You’re black or you’re white. We all belong to different sects and different — different spaces within something that exists above us.

And there is no difference. There’s literally no difference. Because if someone goes to the Army it becomes, “oh, I’m not in the Army, I’m in the Marines.” “I’m not in the Marines, I’m in the Air Force.” There is a certain sense of belonging that they all get from there. And sometimes those things lead to things that are considered to be inhumane. Let’s not speak about crime, let’s speak about the thought of, you know, respecting humanity.

This is my thing about that question. That question is like, “Oh, why do gangs happen?” It’s like, “Oh, wow, why do these black and brown and Pacific Islander — why do these little boys with no structure, no one guiding them, why do they need each other? Why are they trying to figure out life on their own?” That’s really what it is. It’s nothing else. [But] when you speak about gang structure, people ask about killing, robbing and things that are considered crime. They don’t care about anything else.

I feel like it’s kind of annoying to hear those things. Because you can’t find a Jay Z article where they don’t speak about him selling drugs. You can’t find a Vince Staples article where it doesn’t say, “Ex-gang member, rapper from yada yada yada, Vince Staples says this, this, that and that.” Because we live in a space where your name isn’t enough.

In your song “Lift Me Up,” you say, “All these white folks chanting when I asked ’em where my n***** at / Goin’ crazy, got me goin’ crazy, I can’t get with that.” How do you feel about the fact that you have such a large fan base of white people?

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I don’t feel any type of way. … When you perform, when you say that line, you see people start to look at one another. And when they look at one another, they self-assess: “Is he talking about me? Is he talking about him? I love black people, I just kinda like the songs. How dare you judge me for listening to your music” — it forces people to think about themselves, which is a very hard thing to do sometimes. And, all I just say is it’s a statement. I wonder if they know that we notice it, is really where it came from. It was very lighthearted. Because it happens. You get to a song, certain songs — that’s part of the vocabulary. When we get to that part of that song, it’s quiet.

Some of the same criticisms that attended to an earlier generation of rappers have resurfaced. Last October, a woman took exception to “Norf Norf” and posted a video response that went viral — she said,”I cannot believe this stuff is on the radio! This is what our youth is being subjected to.”

What made a lot of people turn their heads is that you were very kind about it. You defended her, you said that people should—

She was right.

Really? What was she right about?

I don’t really care what’s on the radio because the radio’s kind of secondary to how we consume music in today’s day and age. But what she said, “this is what our children are being exposed to”? She’s right. That’s what the song is about: what our children are being exposed to.

My question is, why can we listen to that and pass it off like it’s not a problem? When you see a film and you see a murder scene or a rape scene or something that’s displaying an element of trauma, we don’t look at it and go, “This movie’s f****** great, I’m having a great time, are you?” We feel for that. Know what I’m saying? But it doesn’t necessarily happen in that sense when we’re speaking about music. So I didn’t make that song for it to make people happy. So I don’t have a problem with what she said. You got a reaction — isn’t that the point, essentially?

But you could have rallied the troops. I mean, there were a lot of people dumping on her. And you didn’t do that.

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‘Cause that’s pathetic. It’s pathetic to attack someone for having an opinion or feeling some type of way, for wanting her children to not be exposed to something. ‘Cause I’m 100 percent sure my mother would have loved for her children to not be exposed to gang life. The difference is it wasn’t on the radio — it was in our house, and it was outside, and it was at our schools, and it was at our churches, it was everywhere that we were. So it was kind of a little bit harder. If I have children one day I would hope that they will never be exposed to that.

I hear you.

But when you have people who are able to, you know, just write people off as if they don’t have an opinion or feelings or motives behind the things they say, that’s the corny part. You’re worse than her because she shared her opinion.

She never said one negative thing about me. At all. Her statement was that she doesn’t understand how this is getting to major airwaves — which is debatable, it’s fair for her to feel that way. And most of [all], she kind of felt bad about the fact that it was possible that these things could really happen. Shouldn’t we be, you know, happy that someone actually is considering the fact that this really happens, rather than passing it off as fable or just ignoring it?

So what are you dreaming about now?

I think we just take it day by day, we try to find new methods of creating things and just trying to do something new and — making sure that when it’s all over, you know, we’ve added and not just taken away.

Something that [producer] No I.D. says all the time is that there’s no museum for this. There’s no — there’s nothing dedicated to the quality of art, or the leaps and bounds taken, or the sacrifices and the risks that are made just for the sake of creation. There’s no museum for hip-hop, you see, there’s no museum for music, essentially. We have a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, butthat word is what just kind of destroys it all for me. We’re speaking on fame, not the aspects of art, the creativity — which kind of can become two completely different things at a certain point in time. So just trying to be the most creative and create something that’s never been done before, which is a reoccurring challenge.

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Jackie Evancho On Speaking Out Through Music

“For me to get out there and voice my opinion through music — it’s different for me,” Jackie Evancho says.

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Marian Carrasquero /NPR

Jackie Evancho first commanded attention as a 10-year-old, when she was the runner-up on America’s Got Talent. The young singer won over the judges and the country with her performances of classical arias and a voice that seemed to belong to someone far beyond her years.

Now 16, Evancho has released seven albums — including the new half-classical, half-pop album Two Hearts, which features some of her own original music. She has writing credits on four of the songs on Two Hearts, and she says they’re “a little bit more honest.”

“It is nerve-wracking for me to be singing these songs, more so than my classical stuff,” Evancho tells NPR’s Michel Martin. “I’m a shy person, and so for me to get out there and voice my opinion through music — it’s different for me.”

In January, Evancho waded into the realm of politics when she sang the national anthem at President Trump’s inauguration, at which many other artists would not agree to perform. She says she had to think carefully about the decision, but she’s ultimately glad she did it.

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“It was never about politics for me,” she says. “It’s about the president coming to me and asking for me to perform at this historical event — that will be in history for as long as I can remember. So of course I want to be a part of that. It’s a huge honor.”

But Evancho also says she thinks the Trump administration’s rescinding of federal protections for transgender students is “a dangerous decision.” Her sister Juliet is transgender, and Evancho has tweeted at President Trump to ask that he meet with the two of them to discuss transgender rights.

. @realDonaldTrump – THANK YOU for being open to meeting with me to discuss #trans rights. I’ll be in #DC on 3/30 & 3/31. Can we meet?

— jackie evancho (@jackieevancho) March 27, 2017

“She’s had things thrown at her, things shouted at her,” Evancho says of her sister. “There’s so much going against her … The last thing that [Juliet] and people like her need to worry about is which bathroom they can use.”

Hear more of Evancho’s conversation with Michel Martin at the audio link.

Web editor Rachel Horn contributed to this story.

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Mississippi State, South Carolina Set To Square Off In Women's NCAA Championship

The South Carolina Gamecocks beat the Stanford Cardinals during the semifinal round of the 2017 NCAA Women’s Final Four. South Carolina will play Mississippi State Sunday night for the NCAA women’s championship.

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Mississippi State plays South Carolina today for the championship of women’s Division One college basketball and no, that is not a typo. Four-time defending champion UConn is not playing for a fifth straight title because, of course, Mississippi State upset the Huskies Friday night in a national semifinal game.

What’s being called the greatest upset in the history of women’s college basketball delivered impressive TV ratings and was, according to ESPN, the most-streamed Women’s Final Four game ever, based on total viewers.

Will it be a hard act to follow? Definitely. But for fans who marveled at the way Mississippi State outplayed UConn for most of the game, they can expect more of the same great basketball today.

“To make it this far and not finish it off, that would be tough,” Bulldogs point guard Morgan William told the Washington Post yesterday.

“We’d just be the underdogs who got lucky.”

Mississippi State guard Morgan William (2) and Connecticut guard Kia Nurse (11) dive attempting to win control of a loose ball during an NCAA college basketball game in the semifinals of the women’s Final Four, Saturday, April 1, 2017, in Dallas.

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Morgan and more

Finishing it off means beating a South Carolina team that won both of its matchups with Mississippi State this season – the most recent, a 10-point win in last month’s Southeastern Conference Tournament championship game.

But as the Bulldogs showed Friday, they are a talented, driven group that has every reason to believe the sports adage that it’s hard to beat a team three times.

William, of course, is the Bulldog of the moment – the 5–foot-5-inch player nicknamed “Itty Bitty,” sank the winning jump shot at the buzzer against UConn. It was her second straight spectacular performance. She scored 41 points in Mississippi State’s win over number one seed Baylor in the Elite Eight.

“I feel like with her and with us it’s heart over height,” Bulldogs forward Breanna Richardson said in the Washington Post. “You can’t dictate the play of someone based on how short they are. You have to take them for who they are, and I feel like Morgan is making a statement for that across the world.”

“Heart over height” is a nice motto. But in fact, height also is one of the reasons Mississippi State is playing for the championship. Six-foot- 7-inch sophomore center Teaira McCowan gave UConn fits inside. Senior post player Chinwe Okorie is 6 feet 5 inches.

Junior guard Victoria Vivians is another important part of this team. ESPN.com women’s basketball writer Mechelle Voepel says Vivians was the recruit head coach Vic Schaefer pursued the hardest when he took over the program in 2012.

“She was a scoring sensation as a schoolgirl in Mississippi,” Voepel says, “and [Schaefer] felt that if Mississippi State was going to have a chance to be a great program, it was going to have to keep [Vivians] in state.”

Voepel says Vivians has struggled at times this season with her scoring. Schaefer took her out of the starting lineup at the start of the NCAA tournament, but put her back in before the Regional final against Baylor. Vivians responded and, Voepel says, “She’s been a really crucial factor in the wins over Baylor and UConn.”

But while Mississippi state has the talent, heart and a sudden national following, the Bulldogs face an extremely tough opponent in South Carolina.

South Carolina head coach Dawn Staley.

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Third time a charm? Maybe not

Yes, it’s hard to beat a team three times – but there are a number of reasons why the Gamecocks could do that with Mississippi State.

South Carolina head coach Dawn Staley is past her playing prime but the former college, pro and Olympic star has her Gamecocks poised to make the most of their first-ever appearance in the championship game.

Yes, Morgan William darts like a waterbug on the court, but South Carolina guards have a lot of speed as well, particularly the Gamecock’s itty bitty, 5-foot-6-inch point guard Bianca Cuevas-Moore.

As is often the case with South Carolina, a big factor in Sunday’s game is how well A’ja Wilson plays. Wilson is a 6-foot-5-inch first team All American. She doesn’t have her counterpart, senior center Alaina Coates, to share duties around the basket. Coates has been out with an ankle injury for the entire tournament and Wilson’s had to carry the load inside. How she battles Mississippi State’s “bigs” could play a big role in the game’s outcome.

Even if the Bulldogs contain Wilson, South Carolina can, as it often does, rely on offense from shooting guards Allisha Gray and Kaela Davis and defense. Always defense with the Gamecocks, who, in the two games against Mississippi State this season, held Bulldogs top scorer Vivians under her season average.

Don’t forget the huskies

This will be the first time since 2012 that women’s D-1 college basketball crowns a champion not named UConn. But don’t shed a tear for the Huskies – it appears they’ll be back in the title picture very soon.

All the key players who went 36-0 this season before losing Friday night, will be back next season. UConn signed the top incoming high school player in the country, high-scoring 6 feet 2 inches guard Megan Walker and the Huskies have two top transfers, both post players, including 6 feet 6 inches Azura Stevens who played two seasons at Duke and whose transfer prompted criticism of UConn head coach Geno Auriemma. Friday, his critics had a measure of satisfaction. But anti-UConn gloaters beware. The Huskies now have the best talent, again, and an edge. Losing makes a team cranky even if the losses are several years apart.

And as ESPN.com’s Mechelle Voepel points out, the last time UConn lost in the NCAA tournament was 2012. Notre Dame beat the Huskies in overtime, in a national semifinal game.

UConn went on to win the next four national championships.

Meaning, perhaps, Mississippi State, or South Carolina, enjoy tonight while you can.

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Ikutaro Kakehashi, Founder Of Roland, Dies At 87

Roland Corporation founder Ikutaro Kakehashi.

Courtesy of ATV

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Courtesy of ATV

Ikutaro Kakehashi, the founder of the Japanese music company Roland, died yesterday at the age of 87. The news was confirmed by the company in a statement.

Decades of hits performed by everyone from Marvin Gaye to Madonna used Roland’s iconic inventions. Kakehashi was also one of the original architects of MIDI, a method introduced in 1983 of getting different musical machines to “talk” to each other and which is still in used regularly around the world.

When we think of the people who shaped popular music, we tend to think of the big stars on stage — but a dazzling array of new instruments and new sounds were unleashed in the 20th century that expanded the palettes of these artists. Inventors drove this sonic revolution, playing a role behind the scenes as important to musical history as those in the spotlight; the invention of the synthesizer was as vital as the invention of the electric guitar, while drum machines formed the bedrock for entire genres like hip-hop and techno.

Kakehashi began dreaming of electronic instruments early, in the 1950s. Back then, synthesizers as we know them now didn’t exist; there were a few lumbering behemoths lurking in laboratories and university corridors, such as the RCA Mark II synthesizer, installed in 1957 at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center. The theremin existed, but it only made one kind of sound — a fantastic sound, to be sure, but its uses were limited. Composers devised ways of making electronic music using tape machines, in a practice known as musique concrète. Others, such as Louis and Bebe Barron, experimented with homemade circuits. Independent inventors, like Raymond Scott in New York and Oskar Sala in Germany, were building intriguing prototypes of proto-synthesizers, but these devices weren’t accessible to the general public.

Then, the inventors Robert Moog and Don Buchla started having big ideas and, in the early 1960s, they designed — and later, mass-produced — the first sophisticated electronic musical instruments that would be recognizable today as synthesizers. Around the same time, thousands of miles away in Japan, Kakehashi was formulating his own inspiration.

Rest in Peace Ikutaro Kakehashi, Founder of Roland, and indelible inspiration on my ACID RAGGA explorations. Thank you for synth heaven.

— The Bug(official) (@thebugzoo) April 1, 2017

Kakehashi got his start after World War II with a modest business repairing watches and broken clocks. His life wasn’t easy; his parents died in the 1930s of tuberculosis and he spent several years in the hospital himself fighting off a near-deadly bout with the disease. When he was, many years later in the 1950s, released from the hospital, he started trying to invent his own electronic instruments.

In 1960, Kakehashi started Ace Electronic Industries, also known as Ace Tone. He designed electric organs inspired by the Hammond organ, amplifiers and effects devices, and ‘rhythm machines’ — early drum machines — like the popular Rhythm Ace. But the real action began when Kakehashi founded Roland on April 18, 1972, a story detailed masterfully some years ago by Gordon Reid in the magazine Sound on Sound and in Kakehashi’s own memoir, I Believe in Music.

Japan had several companies by then that were hitting it big in the music world. Yamaha had a head start — it began in the late 19th century and founder Torakasu Yamaha’s first creation, in 1887, was a reed organ. Another Japanese company, Korg, was founded in 1962 by Tsutomo Katoh and Tadashi Osanai. Kakehashi also started another successful music company, Boss, which focused on effects pedals for guitars and bass.

R.I.P Ikutaro Kakehashi founder of Roland. https://t.co/4g2UkCK4gO@ThrobbingGrstle could have sounded quite different without Roland pic.twitter.com/nIUcx9vKKN

— Chris Carter (@chris_carter_) April 2, 2017

Under Kakehashi’s lead, Roland’s engineers developed synths, effects units, drum machines, and many other devices at a furious clip. The Jupiter-6, Space Echo, SH-101 and many others created in this electronic renaissance are still prized by musicians today. But Roland’s most famous inventions — the TB-303 “bass synthesizer,” used to create the rubbery, spacey timbres that defined acid house, and the TR-808 and TR-909 drum machines — were creations of the 1980s that seemed to have little commercial potential when they first launched. (Roland actually discontinued the 808 in 1983, three years after it was introduced.) The 808’s candy-colored keys, clunky preset sounds, and small size made it seem more like a Fisher-Price toy than a serious instrument. But that was part of its enduring genius. There was nothing intimidating about the little Roland machines — unlike most synthesizers and drum machines of the time, which tended to be large, expensive, and hard to program.

Roland’s TR-808 drum machine, which would go on to have an outsized impact on popular music.


Brandon Daniel/Flickr
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Brandon Daniel/Flickr

The 808’s distinctive sounds, from its cowbell to the snare hit, became iconic and formed an essential element of the deep language withingenres like electro, hip-hop, and house. The 808 model number even became something of a meme in pop culture — a word used in everything from band names (see 808 State) to a Kanye West album title. Recently, the 808 was even the subject of its own feature-length documentary, 808.

For Kakehashi, the 808 was just another invention in a long line of them — one that spurred him to include only a minor mention of it in his memoir. Roland was bigger than one drum machine or one synthesizer; Kakehashi’s vision had extended to a whole new way of looking at music.

“Technologies are creating previously undreamed-of avenues of expression in many different fields,” he wrote in I Believe in Music. “It is a wonderfully rich age for artists of all sorts.”

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Ikutaro Kakehashi, Founder Of Roland Drum Machines, Dies At 87

Roland Corporation founder Ikutaro Kakehashi.

Courtesy of ATV

hide caption

toggle caption

Courtesy of ATV

Ikutaro Kakehashi, the founder of the Japanese synthesizer company Roland, died yesterday at the age of 87. The news was confirmed by the company in a statement.

Decades of hits performed by everyone from Marvin Gaye to Madonna used Roland’s iconic inventions. Kakehashi was also one of the original architects of MIDI, a method introduced in 1983 of getting different musical machines to “talk” to each other and which is still in used regularly around the world.

When we think of the people who shaped popular music, we tend to think of the big stars on stage — but a dazzling array of new instruments and new sounds were unleashed in the 20th century that expanded the palettes of these artists. Inventors drove this sonic revolution, playing a role behind the scenes as important to musical history as those in the spotlight; and the invention of the synthesizer was as vital as the invention of the electric guitar, while drum machines formed the bedrock for entire genres like hip-hop and techno.

Kakehashi began dreaming of electronic instruments early, in the 1950s. Back then, synthesizers as we know them now didn’t exist; there were a few lumbering behemoths lurking in laboratories and university corridors, such as the RCA Mark II synthesizer, installed in 1957 at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center. The theremin existed, but it only made one kind of sound — a fantastic sound, to be sure, but its uses were limited. Composers devised ways of making electronic music using tape machines, in a practice known as musique concrète. Others, such as Louis and Bebe Barron, experimented with homemade circuits. Independent inventors, like Raymond Scott in New York and Oskar Sala in Germany, were building intriguing prototypes of proto-synthesizers, but these devices weren’t accessible to the general public.

Then, the inventors Robert Moog and Don Buchla started having big ideas and, in the early 1960s, they designed — and later, mass-produced — the first sophisticated electronic musical instruments that would be recognizable today as synthesizers. Around the same time, thousands of miles away in Japan, Kakehashi was formulating his own inspiration.

Rest in Peace Ikutaro Kakehashi, Founder of Roland, and indelible inspiration on my ACID RAGGA explorations. Thank you for synth heaven.

— The Bug(official) (@thebugzoo) April 1, 2017

Kakehashi got his start after World War II with a modest business repairing watches and broken clocks. His life wasn’t easy; his parents died in the 1930s of tuberculosis and he spent several years in the hospital himself fighting off a near-deadly bout with the disease. When he was, many years later in the 1950s, released from the hospital, he started trying to invent his own electronic instruments.

In 1960, Kakehashi started Ace Electronic Industries, also known as Ace Tone. He designed electric organs inspired by the Hammond organ, amplifiers and effects devices, and ‘rhythm machines’ — early drum machines — like the popular Rhythm Ace. But the real action began when Kakehashi founded Roland on April 18, 1972, a story detailed masterfully some years ago by Gordon Reid in the magazine Sound on Sound and in Kakehashi’s own memoir, I Believe in Music.

Japan had several companies by then that were hitting it big in the music world. Yamaha had a head start — it began in the late 19th century and founder Torakasu Yamaha’s first creation, in 1887, was a reed organ. Another Japanese company, Korg, was founded in 1962 by Tsutomo Katoh and Tadashi Osanai. Kakehashi also started another successful music company, Boss, which focused on effects pedals for guitars and bass.

R.I.P Ikutaro Kakehashi founder of Roland. https://t.co/4g2UkCK4gO@ThrobbingGrstle could have sounded quite different without Roland pic.twitter.com/nIUcx9vKKN

— Chris Carter (@chris_carter_) April 2, 2017

Under Kakehashi’s lead, Roland’s engineers developed synths, effects units, drum machines, and many other devices at a furious clip. The Jupiter-6, Space Echo, SH-101 and many others created in this electronic renaissance are still prized by musicians today. But Roland’s most famous inventions — the TB-303 “bass synthesizer,” used to create the rubbery, spacey timbres that defined acid house, and the TR-808 and TR-909 drum machines — were creations of the 1980s that seemed to have little commercial potential when they first launched. (Roland actually discontinued the 808 in 1983, three years after it was introduced.) The 808’s candy-colored keys, clunky preset sounds, and small size made it seem more like a Fisher-Price toy than a serious instrument. But that was part of its enduring genius. There was nothing intimidating about the little Roland machines — unlike most synthesizers and drum machines of the time, which tended to be large, expensive, and hard to program.

Roland’s TR-808 drum machine, which would go on to have an outsized impact on popular music.


Brandon Daniel/Flickr
hide caption

toggle caption


Brandon Daniel/Flickr

The 808’s distinctive sounds, from its cowbell to the snare hit, became iconic and formed an essential element of the deep language withingenres like electro, hip-hop, and house. The 808 model number even became something of a meme in pop culture — a word used in everything from band names (see 808 State) to a Kanye West album title. Recently, the 808 was even the subject of its own feature-length documentary, 808.

For Kakehashi, the 808 was just another invention in a long line of them — one that spurred him to include only a minor mention of it in his memoir. Roland was bigger than one drum machine or one synthesizer; Kakehashi’s vision had extended to a whole new way of looking at music.

“Technologies are creating previously undreamed-of avenues of expression in many different fields,” he wrote in I Believe in Music. “It is a wonderfully rich age for artists of all sorts.”

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14-Year-Old Charged In Sexual Assault Broadcast On Facebook Live

Chicago police announced on Sunday the arrest of a 14-year-old boy in connection with the sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl that was streamed live on Facebook. Above, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson talks to reporters at the scene of a triple shooting in the North Lawndale neighborhood in February.

Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Chicago Police announced on Twitter Sunday that they had arrested a 14-year-old boy in connection with the sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl that had been streamed live on Facebook in March.

The boy faces felony counts of aggravated criminal sexual assault, manufacturing of child pornography and dissemination of child pornography, police said. They said during a Sunday news conference that an arrest warrant had been issued for a second teenager and that they were actively searching for him.

The girl was reported missing from Chicago’s Lawndale neighborhood after she went to the store and did not return. Then the girl’s mother was alerted to the Facebook Live video of the attack, which she showed to Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson. The girl was found the next day, taken to the hospital and reunited with her family.

Police have said that the attack involved five or six people, and that 40 people watched the assault live on Facebook and did not call the authorities.

Police have since moved the girl and her family to a “safe space” after she was getting taunted and threatened. The girl’s mother said that her daughter had been receiving online threats after the attack and that kids in the neighborhood were ringing the doorbell looking for the girl, the Associated Press reports.

The Chicago Sun-Times spoke with Alderman Michael Scott Jr. when the attack was made public. Scott said that police believed the girl knew her attackers, and that they were all minors:

“It is baffling to me,” Scott said of the Facebook Live posting. “Of course I didn’t grow up with social media. But it’s becoming a place where young people act out movie scenes, if you will, people are getting shot and killed and beaten on Facebook Live.”

Chicago has had a spate of incidents of violence streamed live on Facebook. As local news site DNAinfo reports:

“Last month, a pregnant woman was recording herself on Facebook Live when a gunman opened fire, wounding her and killing a 2-year-old and a man.

“In January, four people were charged with a hate crimes in the kidnapping and torturing of a mentally disabled suburban man on Facebook Live.

“In 2016, a man was live streaming when he was shot and fatally wounded in North Lawndale. Also in 2016 a man taking a selfie video was shot on Facebook. He survived that incident, but was shot to death months later.”

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