Wisconsin Upsets NCAA Defending Champions Villanova

Nigel Hayes, #10, helped drive Wisconsin to a win with a tie-breaker layup against Villanova during the second round of the 2017 NCAA Men’s Basketball tournament at KeyBank Center on Saturday, in Buffalo, N.Y.

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The Wisconsin Badgers ousted the top-seeded Wildcats in a surprising upset in the second round of the men’s tournament. The eighth-seeded Wisconsin closed the game at 65-62, thanks to momentum brought by Nigel Hayes in the closing seconds.

Hayes’ layup lifted the Badgers from a tie before Vitto Brown’s free throw sealed the win for good.

Wisconsin gained the edge when Villanova called a timeout with 11 seconds remaining.

On Villanova’s next possession, star Josh Hart’s drive to the basket was disrupted by a clean steal from Wisconsin’s Vitto Brown. Brown was soon fouled, and missed his second free throw attempt. Villanova grabbed the rebound, but the Wildcats weren’t able to get a shot off within the final three seconds.

Hayes led Wisconsin with 19 points, while Bronson Koenig put up 3 three-pointers for his 17 points. Josh Hart led Villanova with 19 points.

Wisconsin now advances to their fourth consecutive Sweet 16 round to play the winner of the Florida vs. Virginia game on Friday night.

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Chuck Berry, Legend Of Rock And Roll, Dies At 90

Chuck Berry in 1958, posing with his Gibson hollow-body electric .

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Legendary musician Chuck Berry, who was central to the development of rock and roll beginning in the ’50s with indelible hits like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Rock and Roll Music” and “Johnny B. Goode,” died today in St. Charles County, Mo. He was 90 years old. His death was confirmed by the St. Charles County Police department.

This is a developing story.

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At Mnuchin's First Big Meeting, G20 Shies From Endorsing Free Trade

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, right, and German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, left, address the media during a joint press conference in Berlin, Germany, on Thursday in advance of the weekend’s G20 summit.

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Michael Sohn/AP

At this weekend’s gathering of the Group of 20, the world’s 20 largest economies, the group took a step back from its typically overt pro-free trade agenda, in the wake of pushback from the United States.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen represented the U.S. in two days of meetings with their counterparts from the world’s 20 largest economies in Baden-Baden, Germany.

“We are working to strengthen the contribution of trade to our economies,” said the statement concluding this year’s meeting. That wording stops short of rejecting protectionism, as the group has done in the past.

In this first G20 summit of the Trump era, there was trepidation among other members, following Trump’s declaration of an “America First” agenda, and his criticism of the trade policies of China, Mexico, and others. As Steve Beckner reports for NPR’s Newscast:

“At past meetings, joint affirmations of free trade have been virtually automatic. Last year, policymakers of the world’s biggest trading nations pledged to ‘reject protectionism.’ But to the consternation of the host Germans and others, such language is conspicuously absent from the G20’s latest statement.”

Germany dropped the no-protectionism pledge early on in the process, the Associated Press reports, to avoid antagonizing the United States delegation. But in the end, the group failed to find a substitute phrase in support of free trade that all could agree on.

In his first international meeting since he was sworn in, Mnuchin said “the historical language was not really relevant.”

“We believe in free trade, we are in one of the largest markets in the world, we are one of the largest trading partners in the world, trade has been good for us, it has been good for other people,” Mnuchin said. “Having said that, we want to re-examine certain agreements.”

The AP reports that Wolfgang Schaeuble, Germany’s finance minister, suggested there had been tension during the two-day meeting. Without mentioning a country by name, he said, “Maybe one or the other important member state needs to get a sense of how international cooperation works.”

The Washington Post reports that Mnuchin quickly became the center of attention at the gathering, with many foreign leaders seeking to meet with him. During those meetings, the Post reports,

“Mnuchin delivered the same message that Trump had made for months, just slightly softer, according to attendees who spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal internal discussions: The United States would unapologetically work to redraft trade practices in a way that helps American workers. He said trade agreements need to be “free and fair” and balanced. He also said an overhaul of the U.S. tax code was overdue and that the United States would rethink regulations put in place after the Great Recession. …

Two European officials described Mnuchin as friendly but “tough.” They also said the U.S. delegation at the G-20 was routinely checking back with its counterparts in Washington on certain issues, leading some Europeans to wonder with whom they were negotiating, Mnuchin or Trump. But one of the European officials said this was not uncommon for a new administration, which was still formalizing its viewpoint on an array of complicated matters.”

The Group of 20 is comprised of 19 countries plus the European Union. This more casual meeting of finance ministers will be followed by a formal gathering of national leaders in Hamburg, Germany, in July.

You can read the full communiqué from the G20 here, at the German Federal Ministry of Finance.

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Man Shot Dead At France's Orly Airport After He Attempts To Steal Soldier's Weapon

French firefighters and police officers secure Orly airport outside Paris on Saturday following the shooting of a man by French security forces. The attacker was known to French authorities, and his home had been searched following attacks in 2015.

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A man was shot and killed by soldiers at Orly Airport outside Paris this morning after he attacked a soldier and attempted to steal her rifle.

He wrestled one of the soldiers to the ground, but she held on to her weapon and the two soldiers she was with shot the attacker, said French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian.

NPR’s Eleanor Beardsley reports that French interior minister Bruno Le Roux said the man was the same person who had shot a police officer earlier in the day during a routine traffic stop, and who had then hijacked a car. “Le Roux confirmed that the39-year-old man had a petty criminal record and that his house had previously been searched under expanded security measures granted by France’s state of emergency,” Beardsley reports.

The Associated Press reports that the attacker has been identified as Ziyed Ben Belgacem, a 39-year-old born in France. The Paris prosecutor’s office says that the suspect’s house was among many searched after attacks in November 2015 that killed 130 in Paris. The searches were aimed at those suspected of having radical leanings.

Anti-terrorism police are handling the investigation into the airport incident. The man’s father and brother have been taken into custody for questioning, Reuters reports.

Je salue le courage et l’efficacité des policiers et militaires face aux agressions commises par un individu particulièrement dangereux.

— François Hollande (@fhollande) March 18, 2017

“I salute the courage and efficiency of the police and military in the face of assaults committed by a particularly dangerous individual,” tweeted French president François Hollande.

The officer who was attacked was part of a special unit called Sentinelle, which was created in the wake of the terrorist attacks in 2015, the AP reports. The force numbers 7,500 soldiers — half in Paris, half in the provinces. This attack was the fourth attack on Sentinelle since its creation. More than 250 people have died in France in the last two years in attacks linked to groups allied with ISIS.

A similar event happened last month at the Louvre, when a machete-wielding man shouted “Allahu Akbar” and attacked a security patrol, before a soldier shot and wounded him.

Terminals at Orly Airport have now reopened. Some flights that landed while the incident unfolded sat on the tarmac for hours; other flights were rerouted to Charles de Gaulle, the larger airport in Paris.

France has been on high alert for more than a year. French presidential elections will take place in April and May, and this incident ensures that security will continue to be a major issue in the campaign.

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