Engineers Say Tax Increase Needed To Save Failing U.S. Infrastructure

There are 59,000 structurally deficient bridges around the country.

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The nation’s roads, bridges, airports, water and transit systems are in pretty bad shape, according to the civil engineers who plan and design such infrastructure.

The new report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the infrastructure of the United States a D-plus.

That nearly failing grade should boost President Trump’s efforts get a plan to invest up to $1 trillion rebuilding everything from highways and bridges, to tunnels and dams, even though the engineers’ group is recommending something the president and his party likely will not support: a huge increase in the gasoline tax.

It’s not as though many of our bridges are about to collapse or our cars likely to be swallowed up by potholes, but according to ASCE, a significant number of the critical structures and systems that we rely on to get us to and from work; that provide us with clean drinking water, and that protect us from floods are in pretty bad shape.

Take the nation’s roads for example, which Greg DiLoreto, a former president of ASCE, says get the same disappointing grade as four years ago: a D.

“More than two out of every five miles of America’s urban interstates are congested and traffic delays cost this country $160 billion in wasted fuel and time,” says DiLoreto.

Because roads and highways are out of date, and unable to handle today’s demand, DiLoreto says, “On average, Americans waste 43 hours a year stuck in traffic. Or in other words, one in your two weeks vacation, gone.”

He says the nation’s aging airports are increasingly congested, too.

“It is expected that by 2020, 24 of our 30 major airports will experience Thanksgiving Day peak traffic at least once a week,” DiLoreto says.

In addition, America’s water systems are leaking trillions of gallons of water, more than 2,000 dams are at high risk of failure, and there are 59,000 structurally deficient bridges around the country.

“Structurally deficient doesn’t mean they are unsafe,” DiLoreto says. “But it does mean they require more repair and more frequent inspections.”

Mass transit earns the worst grade of all, a D-minus.

“The nation’s transit systems are chronically underfunded, resulting in aging infrastructure and a $90 billion maintenance backlog,” DiLoreto says.

Getting all of the nation’s infrastructure into relatively good shape by the year 2025 would cost $4.59 trillion, according to the ASCE report; that’s $2 trillion more than if budgeted by local, state and federal governments to address infrastructure needs.

ASCE’s executive director Tom Smith says the chronic failure to invest in infrastructure is a huge drain on the nation’s economy, putting American jobs and lives at risk.

“Unfortunately, we have a tendency to wait for disasters and be reactive and what we want to do is be proactive and not reactive,” Smith says. “Because when we’re reactive, it ends up costing significantly more than when we’re proactive.”

The engineers’ group applauds President Trump for bringing needed attention to fixing the nation’s crumbling infrastructure, both during his campaign and since taking office. But it also notes his call to spend up to $1 trillion on infrastructure is not enough, and that his plan to leverage private investment is inadequate.

“We, the American people, will have to pay for it,” says ASCE president Norma Jean Mattei. “There’s no magic wand to address this crisis, no infrastructure money tree, no infrastructure private sector angel.”

The ASCE is calling for a huge, 25 cents per gallon increase in the federal gasoline tax to help pay for infrastructure improvements. The engineers’ group notes that the current 18.4 cents per gallon tax hasn’t been raised since 1993. Therefore, it hasn’t kept up with inflation and with growing needs.

But recent efforts to raise the gas tax even just a few cents or a nickel have been political non-starters with Republicans in Congress. So a proposal to more than double the motor fuel tax is not likely to get off the ground.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer says President Trump will likely stick with his original plan.

“I think we’re looking at a public private partnership as a funding mechanism,” Spicer said in his briefing Thursday. “There’s a lot of work being done on behind the scenes and I don’t want to put a timeline on that.”

Despite the urgent call from the engineers, Spicer says for now, infrastructure will have to wait until after the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act and reform of the tax code.

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Top U.S. Military Official Takes 'Full Responsibility' For Controversial Yemen Raid

Yemeni residents inspect a house that was damaged during a Jan. 29, 2017, U.S. raid on the tiny village of Yakla, in central Yemen.

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A top U.S. military official told the Senate Armed Services Committee today that he accepts “full responsibility” for the widely criticized U.S. ground raid into Yemen in late January.

At the same time, Gen. Joseph Votel, the head of U.S. Central Command, said he was “satisfied” after a review that the tragic outcome of the raid was not a result of “incompetence or poor decisionmaking or poor judgement.”

As a result, he said that he has decided there is “no need for an additional investigation into this particular operation.”

The raid has been repeatedly hailed by the White House as a success, because of intelligence that was gathered. A U.S. Navy SEAL, Ryan Owens, was killed during the operation.

Votel was blunt: “We lost a lot in this operation. We lost a valued operator, we had people wounded, we caused civilian casualties, lost an expensive aircraft.”

At the same time, he insisted that because of the raid, “we did gain some valuable information that will be helpful for us.”

The value of some of this information has been questioned. As NPR’s Philip Ewing has reported, “A terrorist video released … by the Pentagon to show what it called intelligence gleaned by the recent raid in Yemen actually was made about 10 years ago.”

There have been varying reports of the number of civilian casualties in the raid. One local man told NPR that 24 people were killed in the operation, including nine men, six women and nine children. It was not clear exactly how many of the dead were civilians. Among the children killed was the 8-year-old daughter of Yemen-American terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki.

Today, Votel stated that a “determination based on our best information available is that we did cause casualties, somewhere between four and 12 casualties that we accept, I accept responsibility for.”

NPR’s Alice Fordham and Tom Bowman have provided an account of the raid, based on conversations with local residents and U.S. military officials, which you can read here.

Votel said officials are still carrying out an investigation into the loss of the aircraft. As NPR has reported, the “$90 million Osprey, a tilt-rotor aircraft, was destroyed after crash landing.”

The White House has said that planning for the raid began under the Obama administration. It was the first military operation authorized by President Trump.

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D.C. Restaurant Sues Trump, Claiming 'Unfair' Competition

Diane Gross and Khalid Pitts, owners of the Cork Wine Bar, take part in a press conference announcing their unfair competition lawsuit against the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., on Thursday.

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The owners of a wine bar in Washington, D.C., say they face unfair competition from an unusual source: the president of the United States.

Diane Gross and Khalid Pitts own the Cork Wine Bar, located about 20 blocks north of both the White House and nearby Trump International Hotel.

Gross and Pitts say that their restaurant is losing business to the hotel restaurant run by the Trump Organization, which is owned by President Trump. So, they’re suing him and his hotel.

“We feel that the president of the United States, owning a hotel, owning restaurants, promoting those restaurants, is unfair and to the detriment of other businesses in the city,” Pitts said at a press conference Thursday.

Pitts and Gross were joined by a platoon of lawyers to announce the lawsuit filed in D.C. Superior Court.
The case involves Trump’s hotel located in a taxpayer-owned building, known as the Old Post Office Building. In 2013, the federal General Services Administration leased the historic building to the Trump Organization, which opened the hotel in the fall of 2016.

Here’s the issue: A provision in the lease says no federal elected official
can be on the lease or benefit from it.

Despite that language, GSA has taken no action to force Trump out of the lease. Meanwhile, Trump’s hotel is earning a reputation as “the place to be”
for lobbyists, political players and foreign diplomats. The GSA hasn’t publicly addressed the lease since Trump took office. An agency spokeswoman said it had no comment.

The lawsuit cites examples that it says show the president, his family and administration officials were seeking to boost what the lawsuit calls the hotel’s income-producing potential.

The suit, filed on Wednesday, seeks no monetary compensation. Instead, the plaintiffs want Trump to divest from the hotel or close it for the duration of his presidency.

At the press conference, lawyer Steven Schooner said an elected official shouldn’t be competing with the private sector.

“It’s an unacceptable conflict and nobody ever intended that this be tolerated,” he said.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer was asked about the lawsuit
at a press briefing on Thursday. He didn’t speak to the lawsuit itself.
But he reiterated that a president is not covered by the federal conflicts of interest law.

“You know, obviously, the president has made very clear in that December press conference at Trump Tower, he doesn’t have conflicts and he’s done everything in accordance with the guidance that he’s been given and gone well beyond what he ever needed to do,” Spicer said.

Trump Organization lawyer Alan Garten called the lawsuit “a wild publicity stunt completely lacking in legal merit.”

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Massive Ancient Statue Discovered Submerged In Mud In Cairo

A quartzite colossus possibly of Ramses II and limestone bust of Seti II have been discovered at the ancient Heliopolis archaeological site in Matareya area in Cairo.

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Archaeologists working under difficult conditions in Cairo have discovered an ancient statue submerged in mud.

A joint German-Egyptian research team found the eight-meter (26-foot) quartzite statue beneath the water level in a Cairo slum, and suggests depicts Ramses II, according to Reuters.

The team was working at what was once Heliopolis, one of the oldest cities in ancient Egypt and the cult center for the sun god.

Khaled al-Anani, Egypt’s antiquities minister, posted on Facebook that one of the researchers who found the statue called it “one of the most important archaeological discoveries.”

Anani also spoke to Reuters at the site of the statue’s unveiling. Here’s more from the wire service:

“The most powerful and celebrated ruler of ancient Egypt, the pharaoh also known as Ramses the Great was the third of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt and ruled from 1279 to 1213 BCE. … His successors called him the ‘Great Ancestor.’

” ‘We found the bust of the statue and the lower part of the head and now we removed the head and we found the crown and the right ear and a fragment of the right eye,’ Anani said.

“On Thursday, archaeologists, officials, local residents, and members of the news media looked on as a massive forklift pulled the statue’s head out of the water.”

In addition to the massive statue, researchers also found part of a life-sized limestone statue of Ramses II’s grandson, Pharoah Seti II, Reuters says.

Egyptian workers look at the site of a new discovery by a team of German-Egyptian archeologists in Cairo’s Mattarya district on Thursday.

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The identification of the newly discovered colossus as the famous Ramses II is not yet confirmed, as Anani explained on Facebook:

“Dr. Ayman Ashmawy, the head of the Egyptian team, indicated that they are going now to complete the research and excavation work of the remaining sections of the statue to confirm the identity of its owner. On the discovered portions there is no inscription found that would make it possible to determine which king it is. But its discovery in front of the gate of the temple of Pharaoh Ramses II suggests that it is likely him.”

Ashmawy and Dietrich Raue, of the University of Leipzig, have been working in ancient Heliopolis for more than a decade, under trying conditions, as the American Research Center in Egypt explained in 2015:

“Heliopolis once stood at the centre of the ancient Egyptian sun-cult, a core element of ancient Egyptian religion for more than three millennia. Today the site is seriously threatened by new construction and a rapidly rising water table. Eight meters of domestic and industrial waste as well as building rubble have been dumped on the site in the past four years. Added to this bleak scenario is the fact that the level of the water table on the site has risen alarmingly, and continues to do so.”

As of 2015, ARCE explained, the archaeological items in Heliopolis were submerged in a foot and a half to three feet of water — a “most challenging environment” for archaeologists to work in, ARCE writes.

The discovery of a forgotten, submerged statue of Ramses II brings to mind one of the most famous poems in English literature — albeit substituting muck for desert sands.

An Egyptian worker stands next to the head of statue at the site of a new discovery by a team of German-Egyptian archeologists in Cairo’s Mattarya district.

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Ramses II was known to the Greeks as Ozymandias. Today, that name is most familiar thanks to a sonnet on hubris and the implacable passage of time, by Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley:

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said—”Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

That poem is widely believed to have been inspired by a broken statue of Ramses II that is now, like many priceless Egyptian artifacts, in the possession of the British Museum.

The newly discovered statute won’t be traveling nearly so far. Once restored and its identity confirmed, it may be placed at the entrance of the Grand Egyptian Museum, which is expected to open in Cairo in 2018.

NPR’s Merrit Kennedy contributed to this report.

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After An Unexpected Rise, Earl St. Clair Is Ready For More Surprises

My Name Is Earl is Earl St. Clair’s debut solo release.

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Earl Johnson II didn’t grow up dreaming about becoming a famous singer: For a long time, he didn’t even know he could sing. He discovered his talent almost by accident one night, at the recording studio he was working in as a producer.

Now, Johnson performs under the stage name Earl St. Clair . But it was hard at first, which he sings about in the song “Ain’t Got It Like That.” He recalls, “I was producing the single while people was trappin’, chasing the dream and living for free. A whole lot of people helped the hell out of me.”

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“I was doing production and writing where the money doesn’t come consistently,” Johnson explains to All Things Considered. “A lot of my friends, you know, they were doing some illegal activities in order to keep their funds up. And that’s not my choice… so I had a lot of people who allowed me to stay on their couch, sleep in their basement, borrow their money to keep me afloat while I’m trying to chase my dreams…”

Hear the rest of Earl St. Clair’s conversation with NPR’s Audie Cornish, including his impression of Ray Charles and philosophy on self-medication, at the audio link.

Alyssa Edes produced the broadcast version of this story.

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An Unexamined Life, Examined And Re-Examined: 'The Sense Of An Ending'

To Denial!: Tony (Jim Broadbentt) and Margaret (Harriet Walter) in The Sense of an Ending.

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The quietly momentous film The Sense of an Ending began life as a sublimely achy short novel by British writer Julian Barnes (for whom it won the 2011 Man Booker prize) about an apparently unremarkable man with the aptly flavorless name of Tony Webster. Partially retired and on the cusp of old age, Tony receives a blast from his youthful past back in the 1960s that shatters his conveniently doctored memory of a long-buried act of vengeance wreaked on two school friends. How he comes to revise the blameless life he imagines he has lived ever since is his tale to tell, and retell, and tell again until he gets it right. Let’s just say that as unreliable narrators go, Tony’s a champ — and that the movie might just as well be titled The Humbling.

I’m not sure that Ritesh Batra, who made the sweet but skin-deep The Lunchbox, was the right choice to direct Barnes’ intensely inward, rigorously unsentimental book. Indeed it may just be a hard nut for any filmmaker (except maybe Sunset Song‘s Terence Davies, ace externalizer of the inner life) to crack, given that the action is mostly people talking to and, crucially, past each other, while feeling deeply. Still, with playwright Nick Payne’s respectful screenplay, Batra has made an absorbing, if somewhat stolid movie that’s saved by a stellar cast led by Jim Broadbent, for whom the part of Tony might have been written — and not just because the actor can do cranky in his sleep. Broadbent’s tonal range and his rubbery features lend themselves beautifully to this Everyman, recounting for us an adequate life in which the man has become a stranger to himself, to say nothing of those he purports to love, notably his wryly perceptive ex-wife (the great Harriet Walter) and heavily pregnant daughter (Downton Abbey‘s Michelle Dockery).

Governed by habit and low-level hostility to the many who annoy him with uncalled-for civility and friendliness, Tony’s humdrum existence is rudely interrupted by a letter bearing news of a death that leaves him gifted with the diary of a fellow student who had dated Tony’s former girl friend, Veronica, and committed suicide soon after. The conduit for the letter turns out to be Veronica herself, played in flashbacks as a girl by Freya Mavor and by Charlotte Rampling with a precise ratio of irony to fury in the present.

In what follows, The Sense of An Ending may be read as a low-key psychological thriller, with Veronica offering disquieting hints about what really transpired between the three. Peppering his narration with increasingly querulous interrogatives — “isn’t it?” “doesn’t it?” — that solicit our approval, Tony becomes a stalker, turning over stone after stone and, as Veronica drily repeats, still not getting it.

Where Barnes artfully stretches and collapses time to reflect how little memory has in common with chronology, Batra sticks with conventional flashbacks to carry us back to a key weekend that young Tony (Billy Howle) spent at Veronica’s posh country seat, and where her twitchy, alluring mother (a miscast, palpably uncomfortable Emily Mortimer) issues a warning that he misconstrues with, he now learns, disastrous results.

After graduation Tony loses touch with his friends and moves on to marry, raise a child after a fashion, divorce — only to learn, in the school of late hard knocks, that he’s been a textbook case of arrested development all his life. Without ever overplaying his hand, Broadbent gets to flex all his muscles, his green saucer eyes snapping in self-justifying fury, widening in horror, then filling with grief as he confronts the damage he may have done and sheds what a long-ago history teacher (improbably but decoratively played by Matthew Goode) dubbed, in broader historical context, “the self-delusions of the defeated.”

If The Sense of an Ending is an object lesson in the heedless cruelty of the young, it’s also, in Broadbent’s versatile hands, a moving account of the inner turmoil of a man with little time left to right a wrong. What a pity, then, that Batra and Payne choose to lighten Tony’s load by tacking on a redemptive ending. His soft landing may have made all the difference to the movie’s prospects for theatrical release. I’m guessing, though, it must have made Barnes wince, if not bang his literary head on his desk outright.

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A Revisionist Western With A Vision That's Oppressively Brutal: 'Brimstone'

The Spite of the Hunter: Villainous preacher Guy Pearce excoriates his flock in Brimstone.

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As a lascivious man of the cloth in Brimstone, a rigorously unpleasant revisionist Western, Guy Pearce resembles a cross between Robert Mitchum’s sinister preacher in The Night of the Hunter and Judge Holden in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian. He’s a figure of Old Testament wrath, an almost supernatural being who shapes and symbolizes this new world, mainly by committing atrocities under the banner of Protestant righteousness. As with Mitchum, his religious stature grants him the legitimacy to commit violence and sin, but he’s not quite the same petty charlatan, grasping for a big score. He means what he says.

Over the course of a portentous 149 minutes, director Martin Koolhoven (Winter in Wartime), a Dutchman making his English-language debut, advances a damning vision of the American experiment and the original sins that defined it. Pearce’s unnamed character, his accent still thickly European, reveals the lie of America as a haven of religious freedom, where faith could be practiced free of persecution. Its true legacy, Koolhoven implies, is as a home for false prophets, each spreading the gospel as a cover for unchecked misogyny. This is how the West was won.

Though Koolhoven drives his point home with the merciless sting of Pearce’s lash, Brimstone chooses to tell its ambitious, four-part story from the perspective of a young woman who both absorbs and fights his abuses. The first three parts unfold in reverse chronological order, starting with Liz (Dakota Fanning), a mute frontierswoman, running afoul of the new preacher (Pearce) who’s electrified the village. The women in town turn to Liz to help deliver their babies, but she faces a quandary when a breach forces her to chose between saving the child or saving the life of the mother. The preacher believes that’s God’s choice to make, not hers, and takes steps to condemn Liz and destroy her family.

From there, the film flashes back to her adolescence and the series of events that led her from a homestead to a brothel called Frank’s Inferno, where she’s pushed into indentured servitude. There are narrative surprises stringing one part to the next, but their common purpose is to show Liz coming into womanhood under extreme hardship and attempting to leverage some control over her destiny. Through it all, Pearce’s presence looms large even when he’s not in the picture: As an architect of the New World in the 19th century, he’s empowered himself to dictate social mores, especially when it comes to women. And he flexes his authority through sexual violence.

Brimstone is almost perversely uncommercial. On top of the running time, Koolhoven supports his bleak dirge on the American West with scenes of unsettling violence against women and children, including the severing of two tongues as a graphic illustration of female voices silenced. There are no moments of levity or transcendence, and Pearce’s performance is stripped of the snake-oil charisma that made Mitchum such a seductive sinner. The chapter titles — “Revelation,” “Exodus,” “Genesis” — suggest the film’s Biblical austerity, its commitment to plumbing the depths of human depravity and sadism. Pearce tells his congregation that Hell is worse than the mere flames the might imagine; Koolhoven does his level best to honor that sermon.

He succeeds to a point. Though Pearce’s character drives the action, the true center of Brimstone is Fanning, who’s typically superb as a woman who speaks through her eyes and her actions, and summons dogged courage in the bleakest of circumstances. (The first chapter, featuring Liz’s young daughter as her constant companion and translator, recalls Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin in The Piano.) The tricky chronology, too, pays off in a series of clever little twists that add depth to Liz’s backstory and persistently raises the stakes in her confrontation with the preacher. Koolhoven posits their conflict as a battle for the soul of America.

After a while, however, Koolhoven’s inability to modulate the action with wit or even minor shifts in tone makes Brimstone an oppressive grind. Though the film ostensibly aligns itself with Liz and the other women being victimized, it winds up channeling the preacher in its formal severity and sadistic zeal. Koolhoven has made a feminist Western of robust masculinity, and that contradiction erodes its authority — not unlike the Bible-thumper who doesn’t practice what he preaches.

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'Raw' Is Not Well Done

Veterinary students Julien (Rabah Nait Oufella) and Justine (Garance Marillier) flesh out their study plan in Raw.

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The protagonist of Raw is a virgin and a vegetarian, and intent on becoming a veterinarian. Her path to that calling, however, leads through a place that’s literally awash in blood.

That site is not an abbatoir or a torture chamber, but the world’s most disturbing veterinary college, a prison-like institution somewhere in Francophone Europe. (The movie’s principal location is an actual vet school in Belgium.) Rather than a spot where warm-hearted kids learn to care for house pets, it’s a training facility for industrial agriculture, packed with cows, horses, and cruelty.

Justine (Garance Marillier) arrives at the school an innocent, and is quickly debauched by brutal hazing rituals. Vicious masked upperclassmen force the new arrivals to drink hard, party half-naked, and endure a Carrie-like mass baptism. Oh yeah, and eat raw rabbit kidney.

(On the film-festival circuit, Raw was generally well received, but also caused fainting, vomiting, and fleeing.)

Why didn’t anyone warn this sensitive, intelligent celibate? French writer-director Julia Ducournau is adept at sensory overload, black comedy, and gross-out assault, but much less attuned to logic. Justine’s parents both attended the same school, and her older sister Alexia (Ella Rumpf) is there now. Yet the mom who in the opening sequence passionately defends Justine from a meatball in her mashed potatoes does nothing to prepare her daughter for Hell Week at this inferno of a college.

Abetting the frenzy is a lack of adult supervision. Justine encounters a hostile professor and a somewhat more sympathetic doctor, but that’s it for grownups until her parents reappear for the twist ending. In this Lord of the Flies environment, Justine has no recourse when she’s assigned a male roommate. “I asked for a girl,” she tells Adrien (Rabah Nait Oufella); he reassures her that he’s gay.

Adrien actually becomes Justine’s pal, a more reliable ally than envious Alexia. Sibling rivalry turns as fierce as everything else in Justine’s overwhelming new life. Marillier and Rumpf appear utterly committed to their roles, and project a violently ambivalent rapport.

Blood represents sexual awakening as well as carnivorous hunger, and of course there’s a conversation about AIDS. Animal instincts take over, and the results are a crimson mess. There are no safe spaces on this campus — or on the nearby roads, which are experiencing a mysterious increase in fatal car crashes.

Making her feature debut, Ducournau goes for gasps and giggles, as well as sensory dislocation. Jim Williams’ score, generally droning and sometimes deafening, recalls the “heavy organ” era, when massively amplified Bach was paired with abstract light shows. The vibe is psychedelic, although the principal on-screen intoxicant is alcohol. Julia and Alexia’s other drug of choice is an antibiotic ointment to combat the rashes that come with their affliction.

Raw is transgressive in that self-conscious, even sanctimonious Gallic way. It’s in the queasy tradition of arthouse bloodbaths such as Claire Denis’ Trouble Every Day and Gaspar Noe’s I Stand Alone. At least one critic has suggested that Justine was named for the title character of the novella by the Marquis de Sade, France’s patron saint of perversion.

One affinity is that, like Sade’s book, Ducournau’s movie is as tiresome as it is scandalous. Rather than tell a story, Raw merely administers a series of shocks. As sheer spectacle, it’s gutsy. But narratively and thematically, it’s undercooked.

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An Off-Camera Police Shooting, A Trial And The Questions Left Behind

Flowers and balloons, along with spray-painted police markings, show the spot where Jonathan Ferrell was shot and killed by Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police in 2013. Officer Randall Kerrick was charged with voluntary manslaughter and investigators said Ferrell, who was unarmed, was shot 10 times.

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In 2013 in Charlotte, N.C.police officer Randall Kerrick shot and killed Jonathan Ferrell, a black man who was unarmed.

Video from a police car captured part of the encounter, but the shooting took place off-camera. Kerrick was subsequently charged with voluntary manslaughter for shooting Ferrell, and the trial unfolded in 2015. A key piece of evidence was the video. But the way you see that video depends on who you are.

On this episode of Embedded, we travel to Charlotte for the stories behind the night of the shooting, the trial, and the aftermath.

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World Cafe Nashville: Marty Stuart

Marty Stuart’s new album is Way Out West.

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  • “Lost On The Desert”
  • “Mojave”
  • “Old Mexico”
  • “Time Don’t Wait”

Marty Stuart is a walking, talking, singing, guitar-slinging repository of American popular music. The multiple-Grammy winner has had a long and storied career rooted in country music, but spanning everything from honky-tonk to “hillbilly rock” and from Southern gospel and blues to Native American balladry.

Stuart’s latest efforts took him to Southern California, where he worked with Mike Campbell of Tom Petty‘s band, The Heartbreakers, to pay tribute to the myths and realities of life in the American West. Stuart’s latest record, Way Out West, will be released Friday, March 10. Hear him and his band perform live from the Tracking Room Studios on Music Row in Nashville, Tenn., in the session above.

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