Episode 548: Project Eavesdrop

Our reporter Steve Henn wanted to know what secrets his computer was revealing — so he let some hackers spy on his web traffic.

Thomas Jackson/Getty Images

Note: This episode originally aired in June 2014.

There’s a lot of talk about computer privacy, about keeping our data secure. Even if you feel like you have nothing to hide, you probably don’t want your co-workers rooting through your personal data. Your web traffic is like a digital fingerprint. It reveals where and who you are, what you’re searching, what you’re reading, who you talk to, even what you are curious about. But your computer or your phone might be betraying you. It might be giving away your secrets.

Planet Money’s Steve Henn wanted to know just how much someone could learn about him by just sitting back and watching his internet traffic slide by. So he invited a couple hacking experts to bug his internet connection for a week.

On today’s show: What they discovered, and what that tells us about security, smartphones and the dangers of free WiFi.

Music: “The Dirty” and “Quasar Groove.” Find us: Twitter / Facebook.

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LISTEN: At The DNC, We Asked Women Why They Were Voting For Clinton

LaVon Bracy says she can now honestly tell her granddaughters that they can be president of the United States.

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

LaVon Bracy says she can now honestly tell her granddaughters that they can be president of the United States. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Karla Stoebis, who came to the convention as a Sanders supporter, now wishes her "strong Democratic grandmothers" were here to witness history.

Karla Stoebis, who came to the convention as a Sanders supporter, now wishes her “strong Democratic grandmothers” were here to witness history. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Carmen Guzman of McLean, Va., and originally from Oaxaca, Mexico on the final day of the Democratic National Convention.

Carmen Guzman of McLean, Va., and originally from Oaxaca, Mexico on the final day of the Democratic National Convention. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Katherine Hensley says a female presidential candidate has been "a dream."

Katherine Hensley says a female presidential candidate has been “a dream.” Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Meg Kelly/NPR

Debroah Langhoff says that her mother was born at a time when women didn't have the right to vote and that she would be lying if she said history didn't play a role in her decision to back Clinton.

Debroah Langhoff says that her mother was born at a time when women didn’t have the right to vote and that she would be lying if she said history didn’t play a role in her decision to back Clinton. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Meg Kelly/NPR

Loretta Talbott says Clinton's nomination proves women are just as powerful as men.

Loretta Talbott says Clinton’s nomination proves women are just as powerful as men. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Meg Kelly/NPR

Diana Hatsis-Neuhoff says her decision to now support Clinton had "nothing to do with what was between my legs."

Diana Hatsis-Neuhoff says her decision to now support Clinton had “nothing to do with what was between my legs.” Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Eva Smalls with her mother Dawn Smalls (not pictured) says she likes Clinton because “she’s a girl.” Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Your Thoughts: What Does It Mean To Be A 'Feminist' In Your Country?

Students at St. Scholastica’s College in the Philippines gesture the “No. 1” sign in a campaign to end discrimination and violence against women and girls. NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images

In Rwanda, some consider feminism a dirty word, says NPR’s Gregory Warner in his Invisibilia podcast. It’s shorthand for too aggressive, too liberated, too selfish. Yet women in Rwanda hold 64 percent of the seats in parliament — more than any other country.

What he found is that even in a country that seemingly embraces gender equality, there are invisible forces — belief systems and cultural traditions — that may shape society’s view of how a woman should behave, what it means to exercise her rights and how far she should push her boundaries.

That made us curious: What does it mean to be a feminist in different countries around the world? And what are the “invisible forces” that influence the definition of feminism?

We’d love for you to weigh in. Share your response in a comment below, or post it on Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #FeminismInMyCountry. Photos are encouraged! We’ll share some of the submissions in a post on Goats and Soda next week.

To get the conversation started, we asked a few folks from our global audience to express their views. Some declined to respond because they didn’t consider themselves a “feminist.” Here are some of the comments we received, edited for length and clarity.

Zambia: “Being a girl was not a reason to fail”

Being a feminist to me is recognizing that though we have equal rights, there are certain circumstances when as a woman I will need to work harder for the same pay or recognition as a man.

My mother was a professor in education policy and gender studies and taught me the positive aspects of our culture that foster self-confidence. When I was growing up, the bar was set very high for achieving success. Being a girl was not a reason to fail.

Jacqueline Musiitwa, 34, lawyer

Paraguay: “Both men and women need to work to advance it”

When Paraguayans think of feminism, I think they think of outspoken, independent and even rebellious women. But for me, feminism is about the equality of the genders. I think both men and women need to work to advance it.

Social attitudes are hard to change due to the strong influence of the national and regional culture of “machismo.” Men have been typically seen as the breadwinners, while women have been seen as homemakers, solely in charge of raising children and teaching them manners. In recent years, economic growth and democracy in Paraguay have helped things move along.

Julia Corvalan, 34, strategy adviser at social enterprise Fundacion Paraguaya

India: “For me, it’s about dignity for both sexes”

Feminists in India are often seen as being arrogant, aggressive and offensive. Feminism, generally, is a negative concept and is associated with radical views. But to me it’s about dignity for both sexes, not about establishing superiority over one another. It’s not about asking for special treatment, but equal treatment.

Growing up, I experienced how Indian society discriminates between girl and boy children. It’s reflected in the number of girls allowed to be born and sent to school, and what is expected of them in domestic work. Economic changes are sweeping this country today, but social changes are not keeping pace. For example, with the Delhi rape case, it was disheartening to see that “blame the victim” culture prevails. Political leaders were saying “boys will be boys.” We need to change patriarchal mindsets and attitudes at all levels.

Ranjitha Puskur, 48, agricultural researcher

The Philippines: “Feminism is a way to discard the machismo values instilled by the colonizers”

I grew up surrounded by strong women: my grandma and my aunts. I also attended an all-girls Catholic school and a university renowned for its activism. We were always made to think that our opinions mattered, that we mattered. I was encouraged to embrace my femininity, seeing it not as a weakness, but a strength.

The Philippines is a patriarchal, machismo society — but the family is where the matriarch rules. The trend of [Filipino] women leaving their families to work abroad as nurses, caregivers and nannies disrupted the family system. That was a big eye-opener for a lot of Filipinos: The roles are reversed, and the women are the sole providers for the family.

This shift back toward a matriarchal society has roots [in the Philippines] before the Spanish colonization. In my eyes, feminism is a way to discard the machismo values instilled by the colonizers.

Yana Gilbuena, 32, chef

Trinidad and Tobago: “Women are valued for all the differences we bring to the table”

We recently had our first woman prime minister. I never heard her qualifications questioned on the basis of her gender. For as conservative as the country can be, there is a lot of freedom and power ascribed to women.

Feminism to me means not making “male” the default in career or in power. It means women are valued for all the differences we bring to the table — and valued equally to men.

Karen Walrond, 49, attorney and nonprofit director

Your turn: What does it mean to be a feminist in your country?

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Larry The Lobster, Saved From Stockpot, Dies In Styrofoam Instead

Larry the Lobster was poised to be an inspirational tale.

The 15-pound lobster was at least in his 60s, according to scientists who spoke to the Portland Press Herald and ABC News, when he found his way from the sea to a seafood supplier.

Jeff Melluso, a chef and owner of a restaurant in Sunrise, Fla., pulled him out and propelled him to fame.

“He thought people would want to see a big lobster. They usually do,” the Press-Herald wrote last Friday. “Rocky, a 27-pounder caught off Cushing in 2012, had his picture in newspapers all over the country.”

#VIDEO: Larry the Lobster: Saved from the plate, dies in freight #LarryTheLobster https://t.co/UUGWGLHE4c pic.twitter.com/FOfIMJ2bY1

— TriCityHerald (@TriCityHerald) July 28, 2016

Melluso pegged the lobster’s age as high as 110, and the crustacean became a local media star. He was soon dubbed Larry — after the muscular lifeguard lobster in SpongeBob SquarePants, the Miami Herald reports.

That makes him at least the second elderly Larry the Lobster to make headlines. In 2012, a 17-pound lobster trapped and sold in Connecticut was saved by a good Samaritan who bought him and released him into the sea. He was estimated to be at least 70.

The 2016 Larry was saved from the stockpot, too. He was destined for dinner when several concerned citizens worked with a group called iRescue Wildlife, Inc., to intervene, the Miami Herald reports.

Larry had been reserved for one family’s dinner when the activists offered to buy him and send him to freedom, ABC News reports.

“They really opened up my eyes and it got me a little emotional,” Melluso told ABC. “We went ahead and donated the lobster to them.”

The Larry-savers made plans to ship him to the Maine State Aquarium, which said it would accept him, quarantine him and then decide what to do with him after that. There was a swift response from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

They called on the aquarium to let Larry loose.

“Lobsters are smart, unique individuals who feel pain and suffer in captivity,” PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman said in a statement. “PETA is calling on the Maine State Aquarium to let this elderly crustacean live out his golden years in freedom and peace.”

Alas, Larry’s golden years were never to be.

He arrived at the Maine Aquarium … less than alive.

Jeff Nichols, communications director for the Maine Department of Marine Resources, says that there’s always a challenge in shipping a live animal.

“Maine lobster dealers do it all the time … they ship live lobsters all over the world, but it’s something that is part of their business practice and their area of expertise,” he told NPR. “This was a situation where, you know, it was somebody trying to figure it out.”

The first attempt to ship Larry was scuttled when FedEx sent him back. And unfortunately, he spent some time on freshwater ice, Nichols says, which isn’t ideal for a marine animal.

The Florida activists repackaged him, with some coaching from the Maine State Aquarium’s staff, and sent him again, the Portland Press Herald reported on Wednesday:

“Larry was packed in a Styrofoam clamshell with seaweed and frozen gel packs intended to keep him cold. The Styrofoam package was then put in another box, providing extra cushioning and protection from leakage. iRescue did not respond to questions about the shipping cost.

“The packaging method has worked in the past for others who have shipped live lobsters to the aquarium, Nichols said. But when staffers opened the box Wednesday around noon, they found a motionless crustacean and broken gel packs.

“Unsure whether Larry was dead or alive, a staffer touched the lobster’s eye, but found it dry and unresponsive.”

Larry hadn’t made it.

“I think people are now unfortunately starting to try to place blame on someone,” Nichols said. “I think the people who were trying to do this were just kind of, you know, doing their best, but unfortunately it just was a failed attempt.”

The lobster had been handled a lot, and spent a long time out of the water, Nichols said. “It definitely wasn’t an ideal circumstance for sending this lobster alive and having it arrive alive.”

Amir Rossi, who helped in the effort to save Larry, told the Miami Herald the stress of the journey might have helped do Larry in.

“We’re all disappointed with the situation,” he said.

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For Venezuela's 'Millionaire' Contestants, Winnings Amount To A Few Bucks

TUTTUGU YouTube

You know the TV game show Who Wants to be a Millionaire? Typically, winners get big money — like $1 million — but it’s a little different in the version played in Venezuela.

Nervous contestants gather at a Caracas TV studio to tape an episode of Quien Quiere Ser Millonario? Some borrow fancy clothes from the studio wardrobe. Others get last-minute touch-ups to their hair and makeup.

Then the show begins.

Eladio Larez, the longtime host of Venezuela’s version of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?, would like to offer life-changing sums of money. But, he says, “Every day, there are fewer TV ads because advertisers face critical problems.” Luis Romero/AP hide caption

toggle caption Luis Romero/AP

Host Eladio Larez welcomes contestants and viewers. “Ready to start?” he says. He challenges contestants to answer multiple-choice questions about geography, history and Venezuelan culture for escalating cash prizes. Contestants must correctly answer 15 questions to win the jackpot.

But this turns out to be a poor man’s version of the game. The problem is Venezuela’s currency. The bolivar has collapsed amid a severe economic crisis. Now, the grand prize of 2 million bolivars amounts to just $2,000.

Most of the prizes are much smaller. Getting past the first question earns contestants 500 bolivars, or 50 U.S. cents. They get another 80 cents for nailing Question 2.

It goes on like this. Angel Mora, who works for a trucking company, does well until flubbing the ninth question. His total take amounts to $12 — maybe enough to buy a simple lunch for a family of four.

Backstage, Mora says his real earnings will be even less because 34 percent of that $12 goes to taxes.

It wasn’t always this way. At one point, back in the early 2000s, the jackpot was worth the equivalent of $100,000.

Angel Mora's winnings were equal to $12.

Angel Mora’s winnings were equal to $12. John Otis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John Otis/NPR

The dapper, silver-haired Larez, who’s hosted the show for 16 years, would like to offer life-changing sums of money. But due to Venezuela’s economic meltdown, businesses are shutting down. And that’s squeezing TV stations.

“Every day, there are fewer TV ads because advertisers face critical problems,” Larez says. He, too, has taken a hit, and his salary is worth far less now than it once was, due to devaluations and triple-digit inflation.

The result is cash prizes so devalued that the name of the show ought to be changed, says contestant Adi Slivvka, who is here with her husband, Jesus Guillen.

“You win, like $2,000. That’s not be a millionaire,” she says.

“The program’s name must be another,” says Guillen.

Something like Who Wants to be a Thousandaire?

“Yes. Yes,” Guillen says. “Something like that, because Who Wants to be a Millionaire? It’s not true.”

Still, the show remains one of Venezuela’s top-rated programs and hundreds of people call the studio every week clamoring to participate.

Show producer Reyna Mogollon says the thrill of being on TV and playing Millionaire is often prize enough. But not for contestant Aiskel Seijas, a 58-year-old security guard.

Seijas says she needs a new pacemaker. Her plan was to pay for the $1,000 operation with a big check from the show.

For awhile, her scheme works. She’s finally ousted on the 10th question, when she names Atlanta rather than Memphis as the city where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.

Even though Seijas made a deep run on the program, the pacemaker will have to wait. Her total take is just $19.

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U.S. Navy To Honor Gay Rights Icon Harvey Milk

Young Navy Ensign Harvey Milk would become a leading figure in the gay rights movement.

Young Navy Ensign Harvey Milk would become a leading figure in the gay rights movement. US Navy portrait of then Ens. Harvey Milk. hide caption

toggle caption US Navy portrait of then Ens. Harvey Milk.

The U.S. Navy plans to honor slain gay rights activist and former San Francisco supervisor Harvey Milk by naming a ship after him. The USNS Harvey Milk, which hasn’t been built yet, is the latest in a series of Navy vessels named for civil rights icons.

The news came in a report published by the U.S. Naval Institute, citing a notification sent to Congress earlier this month by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, signaling his intention to name a Military Sealift Command fleet oiler after Milk. The Navy has not officially confirmed the plan.

According to the USNI News, the ship will be built by General Dynamics NASSCO in San Diego.

Milk was the first openly gay elected official in California. As a young man, he served in the Navy as a diving officer during the Korean War. He was honorably discharged from the service with the rank of lieutenant in 1955.

Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977. A year later, he was assassinated, along with Mayor George Moscone, by another former Supervisor Dan White, over a dispute about White’s resignation from the Board. When White changed his mind and tried to get his job back, Milk and Moscone opposed his reinstatement. In a rage, White killed them both.

The news of the Navy’s plans to honor Milk was met with cheers and some mixed reactions by local leaders and activists who knew him.

Milk’s nephew Stuart Milk, who long had organized public pressure for the Navy to honor his uncle told the San Francisco Chronicle:

“We have just reached the point recently where LGBT people can serve openly in the military, and what better message can there be of that than this ship? It’s a very fitting tribute to a man whose primary goal was for people to be authentic and not have to wear a mask.”

The Chronicle also quoted Cleve Jones, a former Milk intern who went on to spearhead the Names Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt.

“I have no idea what Harvey would think of this. He has been dead a long time. I can tell you I have mixed feelings. It is obviously an indication that gay people are more accepted than they were when he lived. And I think he would be glad of that. But he did not like war.”

The USNS Harvey Milk is one is a series of vessels known as the John Lewis-class, named for civil rights activist Rep. John Lewis, (D-Ga.).

Others in the class include ships named for former Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren, former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, women’s rights activist Lucy Stone and abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth.

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Moreland & Arbuckle On World Cafe

Moreland & Arbuckle perform at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

Moreland & Arbuckle perform at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia. Sydney Schaefer/WXPN hide caption

toggle caption Sydney Schaefer/WXPN

  • “Mean And Evil”
  • “Woman Down In Arkansas”

When harmonica ace Dustin Arbuckle met guitarist Aaron Moreland at an open mic in their hometown of Wichita, Kan., the two immediately decided that they’d better combine talents. That was in 2001, and they’ve been playing roadhouse blues together ever since.

Moreland and Arbuckle are certainly powerful on stage, as is evident in this session, but they continue to shine on their recordings as well. The two Midwesterners have recently been picked up by the prestigious Chicago blues label Alligator Records, which released their new album Promised Land Or Bust. Hear a live performance and conversation at the audio link above.

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Maternity Hospital In Northern Syria Is Bombed, Charity Says

Save the Children says the bombed maternity hospital it supports in the rebel-held Syrian province of Idlib served some 1,300 women and children a month.

Save the Children says the bombed maternity hospital it supports in the rebel-held Syrian province of Idlib served some 1,300 women and children a month. Save the Children hide caption

toggle caption Save the Children

Save the Children said a maternity hospital it supports in the rebel-held Syrian province of Idlib has been hit by an apparent airstrike. The charity said in a statement that it’s the only such hospital for more than 40 miles.

As NPR’s Alison Meuse reported, the hospital is “at least the 10th medical facility to be struck in Syria by bombing in the past week.” She said an unknown number of casualties were reported among patients and staff. Here’s more from Alison:

“A maternity hospital serving 1,300 women and children a month in northern Syria is now out of commission. Save the Children spokesman Alun McDonald tells NPR the hospital took a direct hit, in what appears to be an airstrike.

“Photos appeared to show the entire side of the building blown off. … Last month, staff delivered more than 10 babies a day.”

Save the Children says the hospital “has six incubators for premature babies, and an outpatient clinic for supporting pregnant women and providing after-delivery care.”

The aftermath of the horrific #Syria hospital bombing. Our thoughts are with families & team members on the ground. pic.twitter.com/AOW4Kd01lT

— Save the Children UK (@savechildrenuk) July 29, 2016

The charity posted a video on Twitter showing rubble and ambulances racing to the scene. Last weekend, it said in a statement that Idlib has seen “more than 100 airstrikes in the past few days.”

“We are deeply saddened by the tragic bombing of the maternity hospital in Idlib. Our thoughts and hearts are with the patients, staff, and their families,” the charity’s CEO, Carolyn Miles, said in a statement.

This is how a person there working in partnership with Save the Children described the scene a few days ago: “The streets are totally empty and the smell of blood and gunpowder fills the air. Thousands of families are fleeing the city into the countryside.”

An image from inside the damaged hospital in Idlib. Save the Children says hospital staff delivered more than 10 babies a day last month.

An image from inside the damaged hospital in Idlib. Save the Children says hospital staff delivered more than 10 babies a day last month. Save the Children hide caption

toggle caption Save the Children

Fighting continues to rage in Syria’s civil war, which is now in its sixth year. On Thursday, a powerful extremist group called the Nusra Front said it changed its name and claimed that it is severing ties with al-Qaida, a move that has the potential to complicate U.S. military efforts in the country.

The announcement was made in a video released by Nusra’s leader, Abu Mohammed al-Jolani. The Associated Press reports that it “took place with the endorsement of al-Qaida’s central leadership, and its ideology remains the same, raising questions whether the change really goes beyond the new name, the Levant Conquest Front.”

The shift could complicate efforts between the U.S. and Russia, an ally of Syria’s president, to push forward peace negotiations and come up with a military partnership. In commentary for The Century Foundation, analyst Sam Heller offered this explanation:

“Jolani seems to have been convinced that the United States and Russia posed an imminent danger. So Jolani reacted with an announcement that will do nothing to deter America and Russia—but will allow Nusra to further wrap itself in protective layers of the Syrian opposition public and other rebel factions.”

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'They Failed': 6 More Michigan Employees Charged In Flint Water Crisis

The Flint River in downtown Flint, Mich. The state's attorney general, Bill Schuette, announced felony and misdemeanor charges Friday against six state employees in connection with the lead-contamination of the city's drinking water

The Flint River in downtown Flint, Mich. The state’s attorney general, Bill Schuette, announced felony and misdemeanor charges Friday against six state employees in connection with the lead-contamination of the city’s drinking water Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette has announced criminal charges against six more people — including the state’s former water quality chief in connection with lead-contaminated water in the city of Flint.

All six people are current or former state employees in the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services or the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

A total of nine people are facing charges, accused of causing or covering up the crisis. The state has also filed a civil suit against two companies that allegedly knew about the poisoned water and failed to act.

A full timeline of the Flint water crisis is here.

At a press conference today announcing the latest charges, Schuette said the exact crimes varied but that they shared a common pattern and theme:

“Each of these individuals attempted to bury or cover up, to downplay or to hide information that contradicted their own narrative, their story. And their story was there’s nothing wrong with Flint water, and it was perfectly safe to use.

“In essence, these individuals concealed the truth. They were criminally wrong to do so, and the victims are real people. [They are] families who have been lied to by government officials, and treated as if they don’t count. Well, they do count.”

The three people charged from the Department of Health and Human Services are the director of the child health unit, Nancy Peeler; her subordinate, Robert Scott; and a state epidemiologist, Corinne Miller. All three are charged with misconduct in office, conspiracy and willful neglect of duty for allegedly failing to release a report that showed unsafe lead levels in the blood of Flint children.

“This put the children of Flint in the crosshairs of drinking poison,” Schuette said. Miller has since left the department. Peeler and Scott are still employed there.

The other three people charged today are Lianne Shekter-Smith, who was in charge of the drinking water and municipal assistance office at the state Department of Environmental Quality, and two MDEQ subordinates, Adam Rosenthal and Patrick Cook.

Shekter-Smith faces the same charges as officials from the DHHS for allegedly misleading health officials by saying Flint’s water treatment plant was in compliance with lead and copper rules for drinking water when it was not. She was fired from her position in February, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Cook and Rosenthal allegedly failed to ensure proper water testing, and Rosenthal allegedly went so far as to instruct those conducting water tests that he needed test results that did not show high levels of lead. Both are charged with misconduct in office, conspiracy, and willful neglect of duty. Rosenthal also faces a felony charge of tampering with evidence.

Both Rosenthal and Cook currently work in the drinking water unit of the Department of Environmental Quality.

An independent investigation of the Flint water crisis concluded in March that officials within the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality are mostly to blame, although other officials share some responsibility, and called the prolonged poisoning of the Flint water supply “a story of government failure, intransigence, unpreparedness, delay, inaction, and environmental injustice.”

As The Two Way reported in April, the three people previously charged include Flint’s water quality supervisor and two state officials at the Department of Environmental Quality. Michael Glasgow, the former water quality supervisor, reached a plea deal on misdemeanor and felony charges and is cooperating with the ongoing investigation, according to the Detroit Free Press. The other two officials still face multiple felony charges.

Schuette said today that his office has interviewed more than 200 people for the investigation. But he said, “We’re not done. We’re a long way from done. We’re way far from done. We continue to work every day to find the truth for Flint.”

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