Man Arrested At Rally Wanted To “Shoot And Kill” Trump, Court Documents Show

Police remove a protester, later identified as Michael Steven Sandford, who wanted to shoot Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, at the Treasure Island hotel and casino on Saturday in Las Vegas during a Trump rally.

Police remove a protester, later identified as Michael Steven Sandford, who wanted to shoot Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, at the Treasure Island hotel and casino on Saturday in Las Vegas during a Trump rally. John Locher/AP hide caption

toggle caption John Locher/AP

A man who was arrested at a Donald Trump rally in Las Vegas on Saturday after trying to grab a police officer’s gun intended to “shoot and kill” the Republican presidential nominee, according to court documents released on Monday.

Michael Steven Sandford told a Secret Service agent after his arrest that he had traveled to Las Vegas on Friday from California and then gone to a Las Vegas shooting range on Saturday to learn how to shoot a gun. A complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas also shows that Sandford told the agent that he expected to be killed by law enforcement in the act.

Sandford had a U.K. driver’s license on him when he was arrested.

Attendees to Trump rallies have to undergo screening by the U.S. Secret Service, including a magnetometer to detect any possible weapons. Sandford was charged with attempting to commit an act of violence on restricted grounds.

Trump first requested Secret Service protection in October and was granted it in November.

The most visible threat to Trump so far during this campaign came in March. Agents had to surround the candidate during an appearance in Dayton, Ohio, when a man rushed the stage.

Associated Press YouTube

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Metropolis: 6/18/16

Kaytranada’s song “Bullets (feat. Little Dragon)” is featured on this week’s episode of Metropolis. Liam McCrae /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Liam McCrae /Courtesy of the artist

This Week’s Playlist
  • Bassnectar & The Glitch Mob, “Paracosm” (Amorphous)
  • Beck, “Wow” (Capitol)
  • Machinedrum, “Dos Puertas [feat. Kevin Hussein]” (Ninja Tune)
  • Hermitude, “Ukiyo” (Nettwerk)
  • Choir Of Young Believers, “Serious Lover” (Ghostly International)
  • Tourist, “Run” (Monday)
  • Nicolas Jaar, “Tourists [Creange Remix]” (Circus Company)
  • Ipanema, “Ipanema 2 [Bart B More Edit]” (White Label)
  • Eric Kupper, “Latin Blues Part 1” (Twisted America)
  • Sade, “When Am I Going To Make A Living [Poolside’s Tons Of Drums Mix]” (Epic)
  • Unknown Mortal Orchestra, “First World Problem” (Jagjaguwar)
  • Leigh Morgan, “Dilly Of A Pickle” (Fancy Human)
  • Alt-J, “Tessellate [Blackbox Remix]” (Atlantic)
  • Born Dirty, “Check Your Bell” (Dirty Bird)
  • Sage Armstrong, “Quest To The West” (Dirty Bird)
  • Underworld, “Nylon Strung” (Ume)
  • Tom Middleton, “Heva [Vincenzo Remix]” (Anjunadeep)
  • Maceo Plex, “Love Somebody Else [feat. Joi Cardwell]” (Future Musik)
  • Kraak & Smaak, “Mountain Top [K&S Sweaty Mix]” (Jalapeno)
  • Latroit, “Origami” (House Of Latroit)
  • Kaytranada, “Bullets [feat. Little Dragon]” (XL)
  • Bicep, “Just” (Aus)
  • Flume, “Some Minds” (Future Classic/Mom + Pop)
  • Kinobe, “Slip Into Something More Comfortable [Psychemagik Remix]” (Fuel)
  • James Blake, “Always” (Republic)
  • Gorgon City, “All Four Walls [FT Vaults] [Vaults Remix]” (Capitol)

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One Mother's Perspective On What It's Like To Be A Refugee

Some 80,000 refugees from Nigeria now live at the Assaga camp acros the border, in Niger.

Some 80,000 refugees from Nigeria now live at the Assaga camp acros the border, in Niger. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

It’s World Refugee Day today, and the head of the U.N.’s refugee agency, FiIippo Grandi, has released some startling statistics – starting with the fact that there are 135 million refugees, asylum seekers and displaced persons. That’s a record number.

And behind every number, there is a story.

Falmata Baba Gana is one of the 65 million. She’s a 30-year-old mother who fled her village in northeastern Nigeria almost a year ago after an attack by Boko Haram. She and her 7 children crossed the border into Niger and arrived at the Assaga camp, now home to some 6,000 refugees. Located in the Diffa region in southeast Niger, it’s a makeshift refuge, buffeted by Sahara desert sands and winds, and running alongside Niger’s main east-west expressway.

Baba Gana says she’s still traumatized by the bloodshed she witnessed at home — and so is her young family.

“During the last holy fasting month of Ramadan, Boko Haram came to our village. Pa, pa, pa, pa,” she imitates the sound of gunfire. “They rounded up the men at the mosque and killed about a dozen. And they burned down our market. Even now, the children dream about Boko Haram, and they cry in the night and remember the gunfire and dead bodies. They still tremble, I still tremble,” she says.

Baba Gana says some people lost children or left them behind in the melee. And, she says, they’re worried about the possibility of more extremist violence and attacks. “We feel safer this side of the border, but we know that there may be more of these frightening raids,” she says.

In addition to the security problems, Niger is suffering a food shortage, and Baba Gana says that the refugees at the camp are hungry.

“Life is very difficult for us. We don’t have enough food. When we were at home, we ate three times a day. Now it’s very difficult,” she says. “Children are in school, but they can’t concentrate because sometimes they have food, sometimes they don’t. We don’t even have sufficient drinking water.

Still, the children sing and draw water from the well. Women in colorful clothes huddle to discuss their problems. And men head out in search of firewood for cooking.

Meanwhile, idle young men, like 25-year-old Adam Alhaji Bukar, look bored and fiddle with mobile phones.

The unrest has disrupted Niger’s economy. The 80,000 Nigerians who fled here — and more than 150,000 internally displaced Nigeriens — struggle to find jobs. With many markets closed because of insecurity or destroyed by Boko Haram, there are virtually no opportunities for work for young men like Bukar, who was a farmer back home in Nigeria.

He hopes he’ll soon be able to return home. Not much chance of that.

“We know the Nigerian refugees and our own displaced Nigeriens want to go home. But it’s not yet safe,” says Magagi Lawan, Niger’s minister for humanitarian affairs and disaster management. “We, the government of Niger, are doing all we can to ensure that everything is in place to keep them safe from Boko Haram attacks here at Assaga camp and to find them food.”

Listlessly Bukar tells reporters “We have fallen through the cracks living here in Assaga. There are no markets. There’s no business and we simply have nothing to do.”

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Girl finds Olympic gold medal stolen from Atlanta parking lot

A 1992 Olympic gold medal stolen from champion canoeist Joe Jacobi’s car earlier this month in Atlanta was found by a 6-year-old girl and returned to him, he said on Monday.

The girl spotted the medal in a wooded area while on a walk with her family on Saturday. The family contacted Jacobi through a website he established after the medal he won in the two-man canoe slalom event in Barcelona, Spain, was stolen from a nearby restaurant parking lot.

The medal was missing its base when found, Jacobi said in a phone interview, but appeared mostly intact.

Jacobi, 46, displays the medal in speaking events and had it with him for a television appearance in Atlanta the next day.

He was inside a restaurant when three men in a Volkswagen Passat drove up and broke car windows in the parking lot, Atlanta police said. Jacobi, who lives in Tennessee, launched a social media campaign with his wife to recover the medal.

Although the medal could possibly be restored to its original state, Jacobi said he may keep it the way it is as a reminder of the story behind its loss and recovery.

“It’s pretty cool just as it is,” he said in a phone interview. “This is pretty awesome.”

(Editing by Letitia Stein and Peter Cooney)

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Are Millennials Chocolate Chip-o-crites?

Chocolate bars from San Francisco-based Dandelion Chocolate. The company makes reports about its sourcing practices available to the public online.

Chocolate bars from San Francisco-based Dandelion Chocolate. The company makes reports about its sourcing practices available to the public online. Courtesy of Dandelion Chocolate hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Dandelion Chocolate

If you give a millennial a cookie, he’ll ask for some organic milk to go with it. So goes the food industry’s conventional wisdom, which has pegged millennial consumers as caring more than previous generations about the social and environmental implications of their food.

But give a millennial a chocolate bar, and he’ll hold off on the questions, according to an April study in the journal Food Quality and Preference.

In a survey of participants ages 18 to 35, millennials reported caring about ethical issues like environmental sustainability and social responsibility in chocolate production. But when choosing chocolate privately, these self-proclaimed ethical shoppers were all chocolate bark and no bite. (Sorry.) Most showed little preference for labels advertising ethical sourcing and instead preferred labels with ingredients they recognized — items like “chocolate” and “butter,” rather than “tertiary butylhydroquinone.”

Lest you dismiss this as another hit piece on millennials, let me say that as a 25-year-old, I stand among the accused. And the glove fits. Ask me about the importance of sustainability in my grocery decisions, and I’ll likely expound upon the virtue of free-range eggs, between sips of whatever farm-to-cup coffee I’m drinking. But spy on my private shopping decisions, and you’ll find a hole in my ethics about the size of a chocolate bar.

“When people choose to consume candy, they’re not usually making a choice to consume something that is healthy or good for them in the first place,” says psychologist Michael Young of Kansas State University, who co-authored the chocolate study with graduate student Anthony McCoy. He hypothesized that millennials also set aside ethical concerns when choosing to indulge, despite a reputation in the food industry for caring about responsibly sourced food.

With funding from The Hershey Co., Young set out to test his hunch. First, the researchers conducted eight focus groups, each consisting of eight to 10 millennials. They found that younger millennials ages 18 to 20 expressed little concern about anything other than taste in their chocolate preferences. But older millennials expressed concern about whether chocolate was organic, fair trade, GMO-free and environmentally sustainable. Young thinks this reflects the fact that many people get woke in college. (OK, he didn’t use that word exactly.)

When asked what matters to them when chocolate shopping, millennials in the 18-25 focus groups cited taste-related words like "favorite" and "fat." This was especially true among 18-20 year-olds in the groups.

When asked what matters to them when chocolate shopping, millennials in the 18-25 focus groups cited taste-related words like “favorite” and “fat.” This was especially true among 18-20 year-olds in the groups. Courtesy of Michael Young/Kansas State University. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Michael Young/Kansas State University.

Among the focus groups of 26-35 year-olds, words like "organic" and "fair trade" came up more frequently.

Among the focus groups of 26-35 year-olds, words like “organic” and “fair trade” came up more frequently. Courtesy of Michael Young/Kansas State University. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Michael Young/Kansas State University.

Then the researchers presented another group of 214 millennials with unbranded, unpriced labels varying in traits — such as ingredients used, fat content, and ethical endorsement (for example, a label indicating Rainforest Alliance certification). Each millennial was asked to choose between side-by-side label comparisons of varying chocolate products — roughly 400 times. Most participants consistently paid attention to whether or not they could pronounce the ingredients in a bar, but only a small, socially conscious group — representing 14 percent of participants — showed strong preference for ethical labels.

The findings “confirmed what I thought,” says corporate sustainability specialist Sandra Rousseau from the University of Leuven, Belgium, who was not involved in the research. She cautions that the study disproportionately sampled college students, but says the findings make sense. “You interview young people, and they tend to be quite aware of social issues and environmental issues. But if you push a bit harder, it’s a lot of talk, but not always action.”

That’s not to say that millennials are secretly truffle-munching, Nietzsche-reading nihilists.

Michael Young says millennials are likely more concerned about ethics when buying goods that aren’t as indulgent as chocolate. Millennials still care more, he says, about ethical food production than older generations, who grew up before many of these issues were mainstream concerns. This jives with the perspective of Beth Morones, a 24-year-old grocery store clerk in Phoenix, Ariz.

“I buy organic milk, organic eggs, organic meat,” she says. But on social media, she’s poked fun at the lapses in her own shopping ethos — admitting she ignores ethical labeling concerns when choosing chocolate, like the Hershey’s syrup she uses to make chocolate milk. Why the discrepancy? Morones says it has to do with how frequently shoppers purchase goods. Meat and eggs, in contrast to chocolate, she says, are something “a lot of people consume … on a daily basis.”

What’s more, labels are not the only way to identify ethically produced food. For example, Dandelion Chocolate, a chocolate producer in San Francisco, doesn’t use official third-party seals certifying ethical sourcing on its chocolate, but it does make its annual sourcing reports available to the public.

“We get all types of consumers,” says CEO and co-founder Todd Masonis. “People come in because they just see a sign that says ‘chocolate.’ ” But he says many of these customers ultimately enroll in educational cooking classes, and even travel with Dandelion to Belize to learn about sourcing.

In other words, we millennial chocoholics are reachable; we might just need a little more coaxing to remember our ethics when we’re cocoa-crazed. A trip to Belize, anyone?

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The Return Of The King: LeBron Brings NBA Trophy Home To Cleveland

Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James holds up the NBA Championship trophy alongside teammates after arriving in Cleveland Monday.

Cleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James holds up the NBA Championship trophy alongside teammates after arriving in Cleveland Monday. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

toggle caption Tony Dejak/AP

Surrounded by his teammates just a few steps off off the airplane, LeBron James hoisted the NBA championship trophy and bellowed out a happy roar to a crowd of 20,000 screaming fans. J.R. Smith appeared to have lost his shirt somewhere during last night’s celebrations. Kevin Love was sporting a giant professional wrestling belt. And the party in Cleveland is just getting started.

LeBron raises the trophy and screams at the Cleveland crowd from the plane steps https://t.co/sBG2eBLAe7

— The Cauldron (ICYMI) (@CauldronICYMI) June 20, 2016

It’s been 52 years since Cleveland won a major sports title. And that was enough to get a veteran Cleveland sportscaster celebrating like a member of the team. Cleveland.com reports:

“Austin Carr, the Cavs TV broadcaster and former player in the 1970s, said he was still stunned at the Cavs, who are the first team in history to overcome a 3-1 deficit to win a championship.

” ‘I still can’t believe it,’ he said after riling up the crowd before the Cavs arrived. ‘I haven’t slept. I feel like I’ve been walking on air for 20 hours.’ “

There’s a parade planned for Wednesday in the city. But with the triumphant return of James and the Cavs, Cleveland.com talked to a lot of people who couldn’t wait until then to spill out into the streets and then to the airport to greet their team:

“Nick Toler and Cassandra Wheeler of Macedonia said they partied downtown, stopped at Denny’s and got to the airport about 5 a.m.

” ‘I never realized the city could come alive like that,’ Wheeler said.

” ‘We had to come down here,’ Toler said. ‘It’s never happened before. We don’t know if it will ever happen again. It’s worth missing a day’s sleep for this.’ “

After coming down off the airplane stairway, James walked the golden trophy past the crowd so people could snap photos it.

GOAT level trolling by @KingJames #NBAFinals pic.twitter.com/cgrNSq2Hl5

— Walcott (@DJ_illAdvised) June 20, 2016

It seems though that the trip home from California to Cleveland was too long a flight for the Cavs to make without a pit-stop. The team’s plane landed in Las Vegas around 2 a.m. PT for some dancing and partying at a casino nightclub:

J.R. Smith is the star of the party at XS. pic.twitter.com/aGJWrH94DT

— Arash Markazi (@ArashMarkazi) June 20, 2016

But now that the Cavs are home, it’s a safe bet that many fans won’t be getting quite enough sleep for at least another day.

Oh you talking teams? The fellas are back in #Cleveland. #YBFSports pic.twitter.com/62VHvK8jI2

— YBF CHIC (@TheYBF) June 20, 2016

City officials say they’ll soon be announcing more details about the parade.

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Nashville Sessions: Tomi Lunsford

Tomi Lunsford at EastSide Manor Studios in Nashville, Tenn.

Tomi Lunsford at EastSide Manor Studios in Nashville, Tenn. Todd Burkett for WXPN hide caption

toggle caption Todd Burkett for WXPN

  • “I Wish I Was A Mole In The Ground”
  • “Rain”

For every country star and insurgent new sensation, Nashville boasts a dozen musicians who’ve perfected their art over many years. Tomi Lunsford is one such exceptional, undersung talent. She hails from a prestigious family — her great-uncle was the revered folklorist and songwriter Bascom Lamar Lunsford, and her father, fiddler Jim Lunsford, played with the likes of Roy Acuff and Bob Wills. Tomi herself began singing professionally as a teen with Jim and her harmonizing sisters. Jim’s sudden passing in 1978 derailed the family band, however, and Tomi began her lifelong practice of learning about all kinds of music, studying to be a voice teacher and pursuing a sound that goes beyond what anyone among her kin had done.

Staying connected to her musical peers by singing background parts on albums by friends like David Olney, Lunsford has forged a union among country, folk and jazz. Her soprano is a truly otherworldly instrument, complementing a warm and witty style of storytelling. Joining us for a session at EastSide Manor, Lunsford speaks about the various streams of sound that combine within her own; her pleasure in working with the esteemed producer Robin Eaton and a top-notch band, including the legendary guitarist Mac Gayden; and how tending her garden helps her stay patient and creative.

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